Ashley Judd Recites Powerful ‘Nasty Woman’ Poem at Women’s March

This article originally appeared on Entertainment Weekly.

Ashley Judd used her time at the Women’s March on Washington to recite a poem called “Nasty Woman,” which refers to President Donald Trump as “a man who looks like he bathes in Cheetos dust.”

The poem was written by 19-year-old Tennessee resident Nina Donovan, who first performed her work in December of last year. (At the time, Judd shared a clip of Donovan reciting the poem to her Facebook page. “Enjoy your baptism by slam poetry fire,” Judd wrote. “The intersectional, social justice themes presented rocked my word.”)

“I am not nasty like the combo of Trump and Pence being served up to me in my voting booths. I’m nasty like the battles my grandmothers fought to get me into that voting booth,” Judd read on Saturday. “I’m nasty like the fight for wage equality. Scarlett Johansson, why were the female actors paid less than half of what the male actors earned last year. See, even when we do go into higher paying jobs our wages are still cut with blades sharpened by testosterone. Why is the work of a black woman and a Hispanic woman worth only 63 and 54 cents of a white man’s privileged daughter? This is not a feminist myth. This is inequality. So we are not here to be debunked. We are here to be respected. We are here to be nasty.”

A later verse in Donovan’s poem calls out Trump for his comments about being able to grab women “by the p—y” because of his fame. (Trump’s remarks came during a conversation with Access Hollywood co-host Billy Bush in 2005; the unaired video of their conversation was unearthed last year.)

RELATED VIDEO: Former PEOPLE Writer Natasha Stoynoff Speaks After Trump Controversy

“And our p—ies ain’t for grabbing. There for reminding you that our walls are stronger than America’s ever will be,” Judd read on Saturday. “Our p—ies are for our pleasure. They are for birthing new generations of filthy, vulgar, nasty, proud, Christian, Muslim, Buddhist, Sikh, you name it, for new generations of nasty women. So if you a nasty woman, or you love one who is, let me hear you say, hell yeah.”

Judd was one of a number of high-profile stars to attend the Women’s March in Washington, D.C. and around the country.

6-Year-Old Girl Who Handed Letter to Pope Francis: ‘Let Us Fight with Love, Faith and Courage’

Even the smallest voices can make a big impact.

The little girl who delivered a letter to Pope Francis during his U.S. visit in September 2015 pleading for his help in saving her parents from deportation spoke out in support of immigration reform at the Women’s March on Washington on Saturday.

Delivering powerful remarks in both English and Spanish, 6-year-old Sophie Cruz, flanked by her parents and younger sister, told the crowd: “We are here together making a chain of love to protect our families. Let us fight with love, faith and courage so that our families will not be destroyed.”

“I also want to tell the children not to be afraid because we are not alone,” she continued. “There are still many people that have their hearts filled with love and tenderness to snuggle in this path of life. Let’s keep together and fight for the rights. God is with us!”

RELATED PHOTOS: Powerful Photos from Women’s Marches Around the World

After her speech, she led the crowd in a chant of “si se puede!” — which means “yes we can!” in Spanish. The phrase is a popular rallying cry amongst Latinos and was popularized by Cesar Chavez’s fellow activist Dolores Huerte.

Sophie, an American citizen whose parents are both undocumented immigrants from Mexico, made headlines in 2015 when she squeezed through security barriers to hand-deliver a letter to Pope Francis during his visit to Washington, D.C.

In her letter, she asked the pontiff to help all immigrant children, writing, “My friends and I love each other without caring about the color of our skin.”

She told CBS News in an interview at the time, “Pope Francis I want to tell you that my heart is sad. And I would like to ask you to speak with the president and the Congress in legalizing my parents because every day I am scared they will take them away from me.”

These Aerial Views of Women’s Marches From Across the Globe Are Breathtaking

It’s going to be impossible to gauge exactly how many people showed up for the hundreds of women’s marches that were held across the world on Saturday. But aerials views shared to social media help grasp just how expansive the protest efforts were.

What began as a simple Facebook invitation to protest the election of president Donald Trump turned into a global movement on Saturday, as millions of women (and men) across the world  took to the streets in solidarity.

Their signature event was the Women’s March on Washington, D.C., where than 500,000 people were expected to participate. The crowd was breathtaking —and appeared to much larger than the crowd who gathered for Trump’s inauguration the day before.

The Women’s March:

Trump’s Inauguration:

Here are a collection of aerial shots (and side-by-sides) from the march in Washington D.C.:

 

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Sister marches also took place throughout the 50 states across the country, from Chicago, to New York, to Seattle — where local police reported 3 miles of people took to the streets from Judkins Park to the Seattle Center.

In Chicago, organizers canceled the march portion of their event for safety reasons after the overflow crowd reached an estimated 150,000. In New York, tens of thousands converged on Trump’s home at the glittering Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue.

More than 600 “sister marches” were planned around the world. Organizers estimated 3 million people would march worldwide, according to the Associated Press.

Here was Denver:

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Boston:

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Chicago:

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Minneapolis-Saint Paul:

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St. Louis:

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Los Angeles:

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St. Petersburg:

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Memphis:

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Raleigh:

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Louisville:

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And New York City:

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There were global protests across the seven contents too — including throughout Canada, Paris Scotland and Cairo, Egypt.

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At least one person wasn’t swayed by all the stunning crowds gathered — Brad Parscale, the former digital director for the president’s campaign.

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“MEDIA we get it,” he wrote on Twitter. “More people showed up for other events. Trump supporters are everyday Americans, $1000/day in D.C. is no joke. #elitists.”

Trump himself addressed the reports of attendees when he made an appearance at the CIA on Saturday. The president wrongly claimed that 1.5 million people showed up to his inauguration (reports initially claimed that they expected 800,000 to show up to the inauguration) and photos, videos and reports from the scene showed that the number was far below that. He also wrongly claimed that the crowd reached back to the Washington Monument, which was quickly debunked by photos from the event.

Madonna Drops the F-bomb Three Times During Impassioned Women’s March Speech

This article originally appeared on Entertainment Weekly.

Madonna joined the ranks of powerful speeches at the Women’s March Saturday, but a few of her candid moments caused controversy.

Taking the stage at the Washington rally after powerful speeches from America Ferrera, Ashley Judd, and Scarlett Johansson, among other, the Material Girl delivered a rousing message she began with: “Welcome to the love revolution.”

While the event was led by women, Madonna addressed an impact against “all marginalized people, where being uniquely different, right now, might truly be considered a crime.” During the speech, the “Holiday” singer dropped three f-bombs, after which CNN and MSNBC cut away. C-Span continued their coverage, while CNN anchor Brooke Baldwin apologized for the lack of censoring.

RELATED VIDEO: Former PEOPLE Writer Natasha Stoynoff Speaks After Trump Controversy

Addressing the opposing members of the march, Madonna was clear on her feelings that this moment is “the beginning of a much-needed change.” She followed up the statement with a comparison between violence and peaceful protest. “Yes, I’m angry. Yes, I am outraged. Yes, I have thought an awful lot about blowing up the White House, but I know this won’t change anything. We cannot fall into despair. As the poet W.H. Auden wrote on the eve of World War II: ‘We must love one another or die. I choose love’.”

In her final moments before performing live, Madonna asked for a rallying cry of “we choose love” to spread across the march.